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In the Journals

How We Think About Our Past Experiences Affects How We Can Help Others

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Have you ever told a friend experiencing a troubling situation “I know exactly how you feel”?

This empathic response is usually driven by a connection we’ve made with our own similar experiences. Having “been there”, we believe we know what it’s like to be them. But do we really?

The Paradox of Helping: Endorsing for Others What We Oppose for Ourselves

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A homeless person approaches you during the lunch hour, appealing for a few dollars to buy lunch. You are moved to help, but you have a choice—you could either give the person a portion of your own sandwich to eat, or give them cash. Which would you prefer?

Now, consider a second scenario. Your friend approaches you at lunch, also appealing for a few dollars. Would you give to your friend part of your sandwich or the money?

Can People ‘Like Me’ Go to College? Inequality and Dreams of Higher Ed

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The cost of college may be on the rise, but most still agree that it’s a sound investment. There are, in fact, a number of personal and societal benefits associated with getting a bachelor’s degree and, it seems, people know that: Over 90 percent of Americans – across all races and socioeconomic statuses – aspire to attend college.

Research on "Sexual Afterglow" Shows the Lingering Benefits of Sex

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By Andrea Meltzer

Sex is a defining feature of romantic relationships. From an evolutionary perspective, sex is essential for reproduction. Without it, the human species would die off. But some researchers have proposed that sex has a secondary function in humans and other animals whose offspring benefit from the presence of both parents—sex facilitates pair bonding and thus functions to keep couples happily together over time.

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