Monica Biernat: Background

Education

  • Ph.D., University of Michigan, Psychology, 1989
  • M.A., University of Michigan, Psychology, 1986
  • A.B., University of Michigan, Psychology and Communication, 1984

Positions

  • 2016 - present, University Distinguished Professor of Psychology, University of Kansas
  • 2003 - 2016, Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Kansas
  • 2000 - present, Director of Social Psychology Ph.D. Program, University of Kansas
  • 1995 - 2003, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Kansas
  • 1992 - 1995, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Kansas
  • 1989 - 1992, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Florida

Honors

  • Louise E. Byrd Graduate Educator Award, University of Kansas, 2018
  • McNair Scholars Program, Mentor of the Year Award, 2018
  • International Society for Self and Identity (ISSI) “Best paper of the year” award, 2017, for Villicana, Delucio, & Biernat (2016).
  • Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) 2012 Award for Distinguished Service to the Society
  • Association for Women in Psychology, Distinguished Publication Award, 2005, (for “Maternal Wall” issue of Journal of Social Issues)
  • W. T. Kemper Fellowship for Teaching Excellence, University of Kansas, 2004
  • APA Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology in the area of Social Psychology, 1998/1999 [Citation appears in American Psychologist (1999), Vol. 54, pp. 897-899.]

SPSP Service

  • Member, SPSP Publication Committee, 2018-present
  • Editor, Personality and Social Psychology Review, 2014-2017
  • SPSP Secretary/Treasurer, 2010-2012
  • Member of SPSP Executive Committee, 2001 – 2003
  • Chair, SPSP Program Committee, 2006-2007
  • Chair, SPSP Convention Committee, 2007
  • APA Council of Representatives (Division 8 Council Representative), 2001-2003
  • Co-Editor of Dialogue, SPSP’s newsletter (with Chris Crandall), 2001-2008 

Other Service

  • Society of Experimental Social Psychology, Executive Officer, 2012-2019
  • IRB (Institutional Review Board) Chair, University of Kansas, 2016-present
  • Editorial Boards for JPSP, PSPB, PSPR, SPPS, Psychological Inquiry
  • Member, National Science Foundation Advisory Panel for Social Psychology, 1996-1999
  • Member, Bias Interrupters Working Group, UC-Hastings College of Law, 2015-present (see biasinterrupters.org/) 
  • Member, APA Scientific Awards Committee, 2008-2010
  • Member, APA Task Force on IRBs, 2007
  • Senior Research Consortium Fellow, Consortium Research Fellows Program, U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, 1996-1997

Editorial Positions

  • Editor, Personality and Social Psychology Review, 2014-2017
  • Associate Editor, Psychological Bulletin, 2008 – 2013
  • Co-Editor, Psychology Press/Taylor and Francis Essays in Social Psychology series, 2007 – present
  • Associate Editor, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: Attitudes and Social Cognition, 2001-2005
  • Co-Editor, Dialogue (SPSP Newsletter), 2001 – 2008
  • Guest Editor, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 2007
  • Associate Editor, Social Cognition, 1997-2001

Professional Affiliations

  • Society of Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP), Fellow
  • Society of Experimental Social Psychology, Executive Officer and Fellow
  • American Psychological Association (APA), Fellow
  • Association for Psychology Science (APS), Fellow
  • Midwestern Psychological Association (MPA), Charter Fellow, 2009
  • Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, Fellow

Teaching and Research Interests

I am interested in understanding stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. My research focuses on on how stereotypes affect judgments of and behavior displayed toward individual members of stereotyped groups. I am particularly interested in the role of stereotypes as “shifting standards”—category-specific referents that can produce contrastive effects in social judgment (e.g., women being judged more financially successful than men). I use experimental methods and real-world evaluative data to examine the complex ways in which stereotypes affect social judgment and feedback given to individual group members. More recent research projects have focused on acculturation attitudes and the perception of cultural appropriation.

At the University of Kansas, I regularly teach Research Methods at the undergraduate level, and a variety of seminars (e.g., Stereotyping and Prejudice, Grant Writing) at the graduate level. 

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