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Announcements

SPSP would like to provide you an update on H.R. 1806, the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2015. Recently introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives' Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, the legislation in current form contains strong implications for the social and behavioral sciences. Particularly, the bill reallocates the National Science Foundation's research dollars away from the social and behavioral sciences and toward the natural sciences and engineering. The legislation contains $140 million less than President Obama requested for the social and behavioral sciences.
The SPSP website is currently under construction and relaunch. If you visit the SPSP website, you'll notice that we are in the final phases, which means you'll see some placeholder text and circular references in place to circumvent processes not quite ready. Stay tuned for more information, including how to access the new website and database, as well as how to access SPSP Connect! (our new member-to-member communication tool). In the meantime, contact SPSP at spspinfo@spsp.org. 
The APS Board seeks applications for a new Executive Director to begin in late 2015 or early 2016. This search is initiated following Founding Executive Director Alan Kraut’s announcement that he intends to step down from his APS position by the end of 2015 after 27 years of service. Read the full posting here. 
Volunteers are sought to "re-imagine" the SPSP Convention. A Task Force is being created to review alternative programming formats, scheduling opportunities, and other options to enhance the SPSP Convention experience. To be considered to serve on the task force, click here. 
The Foundation for Personality and Social Psychology invites nominations for the Heritage Initiative Wall of Fame.
Mark Leary, SPSP President The past few years have been particularly challenging ones for SPSP and for personality and social psychology more generally.  The field weathered some highly troubling cases of scientific misconduct, which damaged our public image and prompted intense self-scrutiny.  At the same time, SPSP experienced an embezzlement scandal, which consumed a great deal of time and resources and catalyzed a major reorganization of how the society is managed.  Concerns about the reproducibility of our results led to calls for sweeping changes in how we conduct our research, analyze our data, and report our findings.

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