Character  &  Context

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI January 5, 2018

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Welcome Back! This week's roundup covers thinking, funding, data, and a number of resolutions. Recently in the news, written a post, or have selections you'd like us to consider? Email us, use the hashtag #SPSPblog, or tweet us directly @spspnews.

On the Blogs

Andrew Quist, Paul Slovic, & Scott Slovic dicsuss Trump's form of thinking in this shared piece from Scientific American.
 
"Unlike reason and willpower, social emotions — things like gratitude and compassion — naturally incline us to be patient and persevere," writes David DeStano.
 

Psychology Explains New Year Resolutions, Hits and Misses via Psychology Today
"Can Psychology explain why most New Year Resolutions fail and how to keep them?" ask Raj Persaud and Peter Bruggen.

Are Toxic Political Conversations Changing How We Feel about Objective Truth? via Scientific American
Matthew Fisher, Joshua Knobe, Brent Strickland, & Frank C. Keil argue that as political polarization grows, the arguments we have with one another may be shifting our understanding of truth itself.  

How Facebook Stymies Social Science via The Chronicle of Higher Education
Henry Farrell asks, "When private companies hold data that scholars need, what becomes of academic research?"

NSF advisers seek to broaden training of scientists, strengthen research infrastructure, and enhance understanding and use of scientific findings.
 
 

In the News

 
What did we miss? Did you recently complete a media interview or have your work featured in the news? Want to be in the next edition? Drop us a note and a link at press@spsp.org. Your contributions keep us engaged.
 

On Twitter


Recently in the news, publishing research you want to share with the media, or interested in writing for our blog? Email Annie Drinkard, SPSP's Media and Public Relations Manager to get started.
 

 

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Character & Context is the blog of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP). With more than 7,500 members, SPSP is the largest organization of social psychologists and personality psychologists in the world.   

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