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To Forgive or Not to Forgive? Understanding Self-attitudes After Health Behavior Lapses

Image of checklist with exercise and nutritional goals

Health behavior change is notoriously difficult. If you have ever tried to exercise more often, drink more water, cut back on sweets, or even floss more regularly, you can probably relate to this difficulty firsthand. Some days you get it right and meet your new health-related goals, and on other days you fall short.

Want To Cut Back on Snacks? Try Focusing on Alternate Activities

Illustration of man walking down road with fruits and vegetables creating the landscape

How far would you be willing to go for your favorite afternoon snack? Imagine the vending machine near your office is out of it. What would you do next? Some of us would simply choose another snack or just go back to our desk, but others would walk farther to the next vending machine, and still others would drive to the closest convenience store.  

Why Do People Listen To “Experts” Even When They Are Inaccurate?

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From health care professionals to political pundits, policy advisors to sports commentators, advisors are often portrayed as experts in their respective fields. These experts can make surprisingly inaccurate predictions about the future, yet people continue to trust in their predictions.

Avoiding information to protect an intuitive preference

Image of decadent chocolate molten cake on a fork

Starting a diet? Avoiding the bakery section at the grocery store is a good way to start. Not knowing what tempting baked goods are available can make it easier to stick with your health goal.

But what if you’re out celebrating a big promotion, and the chocolate cake is already calling your name? Could avoiding information about the calorie count of the cake before you make your decision also be considered a “smart” strategy?

Can Imagining Your Future Improve Your Health?

Illustration of small person turning a gear inside of an open head

People are living longer than ever. For many countries, average life expectancy is predicted to soon exceed 80 years. As a longevity expert put it, “We should be planning for more life.” And of course, this includes maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

An Illness by Any Other Name: Could a Name Change Improve Perceptions of Gout?

Image of feet on a weighing scale with a tape measure curled up on the floor

The beginning of a new year is a time of resolution setting and recovery from the festive season. We enjoyed plenty of ham, turkey, Christmas pudding and maybe a few alcoholic beverages. But merriment has consequences. In fact, the head of the Royal College of General Practitioners has asserted that due to poor diet and lifestyle habits, Santa Claus probably has a few health problems, one of which being gout.

Supportive Relationships Linked to Willingness to Pursue Opportunities

Research on how our social lives affects decision-making has usually focused on negative factors like stress and adversity. Less attention, however, has been paid to the reverse: What makes people more likely to give themselves the chance to succeed? 

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI July 28, 2017

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Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus news stories and tweets worth a look. If you have an item you'd like us to consider, use the hashtag #SPSPblog or tweet us directly @spspnews.

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI June 16, 2017

Feature Image

Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus news stories and tweets worth a look. If you have an item you'd like us to consider, use the hashtag #SPSPblog or tweet us directly @spspnews.

In Case You Missed It March 31, 2017

Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus a few news stories and tweets that might be worth a look. If you have an item you'd like us to consider, use the hashtag #SPSPblog or tweet us directly @spspnews.

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