You are here

motivation

How to Overcome Unconscious Bias

Feature Image

By Jordan Axt

We all have prejudices we're not even aware of—but they don't have to govern our behavior

Psychology News Round-Up (October 14th)

Feature Image

This Week on the Blog

Our knowledge of how people communicate online and the motivations behind it is still in its inchoate stage. Check out this week’s post to see if the internet is making you mean.

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI September 29, 2017

Feature Image
Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus news stories and tweets worth a look.
 
Recently in the news, written a post, or have selections you'd like us to consider? Email us, use the hashtag #SPSPblog, or tweet us directly @spspnews.

For Decision-Makers Who Want the Best, Focus on the Strategy

In a recent study, social psychologists show that for maximizers, whether you feel good or bad after making a decision is not only a result of which option you chose, but also the process you took to make the decision.

From the Bystander Effect to Political Ideologies: Excellence in Personality & Social Psychology

When you pass by a stranger in need of help, do you stop to lend a hand? Maybe not... A landmark 1973 study found that seminary students in a hurry were less likely to help someone in distress, even when they were on their way to deliver a talk on the Parable of the Good Samaritan. A co-author of that study and several other distinguished researchers are the recipients of the 2013 annual awards from the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP).

Jealousy Can Drive Us to View Ourselves More Like Our Rivals

If you see your partner flirt with someone else, you may feel hurt, angry, and jealous. The last thing you might expect is to start thinking of yourself more like your rival. New research suggests just that: that jealousy can prompt people to change how they view themselves relative to competitors for their partners' attention.
 
Previous research has shown that individuals often will change their self-views to be more similar to someone to whom they want to get closer, such as a romantic partner.

Willpower and Desires: Turning Up the Volume On What You Want Most

San Diego -- Trying to resist that late-night tweet or checking your work email again? The bad news is that desires for work and entertainment often win out in the daily struggle for self-control, according to a new study that measures various desires and their regulation in daily life.

Lucky Charms: When are Superstitions Used Most?

It might be a lucky pair of socks, or a piece of jewelry; whatever the item, many people turn to a superstition or lucky charm to help achieve a goal. For instance, you used a specific avatar to win a game and now you see that avatar as lucky. Superstitions are most likely to occur under high levels of uncertainty. Eric Hamerman at Tulane University and Carey Morewedge at Boston University have determined that people are more likely to turn to superstitions to achieve a performance goal versus a learning goal.

Receiving Gossip About Others Promotes Self-Reflection and Growth

Gossip is pervasive in our society, and our penchant for gossip can be found in most of our everyday conversations. Why are individuals interested in hearing gossip about others’ achievements and failures? Researchers at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands studied the effect positive and negative gossip has on how the recipient evaluates him or herself. The study is published in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

Why Do Men Prefer Nice Women?: Responsiveness and Desire

People's emotional reactions and desires in initial romantic encounters determine the fate of a potential relationship. Responsiveness may be one of those initial "sparks" necessary to fuel sexual desire and land a second date. However, it may not be a desirable trait for both men and women on a first date. Does responsiveness increase sexual desire in the other person? Do men perceive responsive women as more attractive, and does the same hold true for women's perceptions of men? A study published in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin seeks to answer those questions.

Pages