You are here

person perception

In The Blink of an Eye: People Perceive Sex Ratio and Threat of Group in Less Than a Second

In almost as quickly as it takes to blink an eye, we make assumptions about a group of people. New research from UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles) shows people perceive the sex ratio of a group, and decide if the group is threatening or not, in half a second. The perceptions of the number of men in the group are accurate, according to the research.

Nicholas Alt (UCLA), Brianna Mae Goodale (UCLA), David J Lick (New York University) and Kerri Johnson (UCLA) conducted the research. The results appear in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science.

Real Men Don’t Say “Cute”

Psychologists tap big data and Twitter to analyze the accuracy of stereotypes

The Bittersweet Taste of Revenge

Feature Image

By Fade R. Eadeh, Stephanie A. Peak, & Alan J. Lambert

From the biblical mention of an “eye for an eye” to Inigo Montoya’s desire to avenge his father in The Princess Bride, the act of revenge has captured the interest of humans for quite some time. Given the longstanding history of this topic, one might reason that scientific research has arrived at a consensus on the emotional consequences of revenge. Yet, the emotional ramifications from revenge are fairly complex and are often times contradictory.

Friendships, Vaccines, and Impressions: Upcoming Studies in SPPS

 

While many scientists explore what people have in common, several studies publishing online to Social Psychological and Personality Science show us how differences help us understand individuals.

The company you keep: Personality and friendship characteristics, Michael Laakasuo; Anna Rotkirch, Venla Berg, Markus Jokela

Even Fact Will Not Change First Impressions

Austin -- Knowledge is power, yet new research suggests that a person’s appearance alone can trump knowledge. First impressions are so powerful that they can override what we are told about people. A new study found that even when told whether a person was gay or straight, participants generally identified the person's sexual orientation based on how they looked – even if it contradicted the facts presented to them.

From Bullying to Relationships: Mapping Our Online Communications

New Orleans – When we typically think of kids who are the victims of school bullying, what comes to mind are isolated youth who do not fit in. A new study, however, shows that when that harassment occurs online, the victims tend to be in mainstream social groups – and they are often friends or former friends, not strangers.
 
The research is part of a burgeoning field of study into the effects of social media on everyday relationships and behavior.

Using Identity to Reduce Own-Race Bias

People often remark that people of a different race "all look alike.” However, when we have trouble recognizing people from another race, it may actually have little to do with the other person's race. Instead, new research finds that that we can improve our memory of members of another race by identifying ourselves as part of the same group.

A Father's Love is One of the Greatest Influences on Personality Development

A father’s love contributes as much — and sometimes more — to a child's development as does a mother's love.