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Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI June 9, 2017

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Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus a few news stories and tweets worth a look. If you have an item you'd like us to consider, use the hashtag #SPSPblog or tweet us directly @spspnews.

How Many Atheists are There? It's Complicated

Using a subtle, indirect measurement technique, psychology researchers have found that there are probably a lot more atheists (people who don't believe in God) in the U.S. than show up in telephone polls.

In Case You Missed It May 26, 2017

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Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus a few news stories and tweets worth a look. If you have an item you'd like us to consider, use the hashtag #SPSPblog or tweet us directly @spspnews.

Religion and Spirituality at SPSP

By Linda Nguyen and Joseph Leman

Linda Nguyen and Joseph Leman report from the Religion and Spirituality Preconference at the SPSP annual convention.

Irreligiousness, prejudice and new approaches to psychology of religion research were center stage on February 13th at the 6th annual Society of Personality and Social Psychology Religion and Spirituality Pre-Conference. Researchers from all over the world came to share and discuss the latest in religion and spirituality research.

A relationship with God?

By Kristin Laurin

I have relationships with lots of people. I have relationships with my parents and sisters. I have relationships with my friends and colleagues. I have a relationship with my girlfriend. I even have a relationship with the cashier at the Trader Joe’s who doesn’t make me feel bad when all I buy is chips, beer and chocolate peanut butter cups. But do I have a relationship with God? Could I have a relationship with God that bears a psychologically meaningful resemblance to my relationships with the important people in my life?

How Thinking About Death Can Lead to a Good Life

Thinking about death can actually be a good thing. An awareness of mortality can improve physical health and help us re-prioritize our goals and values, according to a new analysis of recent scientific studies. Even non-conscious thinking about death – say walking by a cemetery – could prompt positive changes and promote helping others.
 
Past research suggests that thinking about death is destructive and dangerous, fueling everything from prejudice and greed to violence.