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Arts Engagement Can Help Counter Divisions in Society

Engagement with the arts can help societies counter economic, cultural and political divisions, new research co-ordinated by psychologists at the University of Kent shows.

The study  provides evidence that the arts can act as a key social psychological catalyst that can foster and maintain social co-operation.

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI July 21, 2017

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Each week, we recap featured posts from Character & Context and other blogs around the cyberspace, plus news stories and tweets worth a look. If you have an item you'd like us to consider, use the hashtag #SPSPblog or tweet us directly @spspnews.

The Paradox of Helping: Endorsing for Others What We Oppose for Ourselves

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A homeless person approaches you during the lunch hour, appealing for a few dollars to buy lunch. You are moved to help, but you have a choice—you could either give the person a portion of your own sandwich to eat, or give them cash. Which would you prefer?

Now, consider a second scenario. Your friend approaches you at lunch, also appealing for a few dollars. Would you give to your friend part of your sandwich or the money?

Does being wealthy make you more charitable?

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By Ashley Whillans

Each year, the average American family donates approximately 3.4 percent of its discretionary income to charity. Most of these charitable contributions are made from October to December, known as the “giving season” in the nonprofit sector.

So what inspires individuals to donate to charity?

Psychology News Round-Up: ICYMI August 17, 2018

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This week's round-up includes a look at the recent problem with bots completing online surveys. See what else you may have missed online.

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Want Narcissists to Donate to Your Cause? Make it About Them

BUFFALO, N.Y. — When narcissistic individuals are able to imagine themselves in a victim’s situation, they are more likely to donate to charity, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management.

The study, forthcoming in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, found that appeals explicitly asking donors to put themselves in the recipient’s circumstance were more effective at provoking concern and donations from narcissists than appeals that only described the recipient’s plight.

Generosity and Commitment to Causes Improve When Giving is Personal

Giving something personal increases people’s self-perception of generosity and commitment to charitable causes.

Whether the call to action is to support an important cause, save a life, or offer monetary support, new research shows it’s the personal connection of giving that makes the giver feel more generous. This giving of oneself, from a signature to blood, increases feelings of generosity and in turn, increases the likelihood of continued support of a cause, according to research published in Social Psychological and Personality Science.