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spsp2017

Why Your Identity Matters

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“Black people don’t go to therapy, Joan; we go to church.” So says one woman to her struggling friend on the TV sitcom Girlfriends after her friend admits that she wants to find a therapist. This moment captures an important insight: Identities, like race, gender, and socioecomonic status, are linked to health behaviors. The behaviors that people choose to engage in to promote their health are shaped by what identities come to mind and the strategies for improving health that are linked to those identities.

SPSP 2017 Day Three on Twitter

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On our final day in San Antonio, check out the convention through the social media accounts of our attendees. Saturday's highlights included Ravenna Helson, our 2017 Legacy Award Winner and a community discussion, "What Now?

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Cover Top Research at Society for Personality and Social Psychology 2017 Annual Convention in San Antonio

Explore the latest scientific research on a diverse array of topics – the psychology behind prejudice and discrimination, understanding non-verbal communication, strategies for interpersonal relationships, social factors that influence our decisions, and much more.

For Health and Happiness, Share Good News

Study of separated and active service member couples finds those who communicate better get benefits of better sleep

San Antonio, Texas – Service members, including both active and recently separated, have been called upon to fight overseas and to assist during natural disasters at home. They can face unique challenges when they return in both the workplace and at home. New research, focused on these service member couples in Oregon, confirms supportive, responsive partners provide a buffer to loneliness and sleep deficits among military couples.

The Goodness of Guilt: Problems Measuring the Mind

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Researchers are split over guilt. Many of them think that guilt is negative—it feels bad, it’s related to poor functioning, and it’s something we should reduce in our lives. (That may be your assessment, too.) 

But another group of researchers suggests that guilt is good. It leads people to take actions to repair relationships and engage in prosocial behavior. Our attempts to get rid of guilt lead to good behavior—and ultimately the guilt experience and response is positive. 

Facts, Beliefs, and Identity: The Seeds of Science Skepticism

From climate skeptics to anti-vaxxers, psychologists are studying what motivates and drives our decisions to pay attention to some facts while ignoring others.

San Antonio, Texas – Psychological researchers are working to understand the cognitive processes, ideologies, cultural demands, and conspiracy beliefs that cause smart people to resist scientific messages. Using surveys, experiments, observational studies and meta-analyses, the researchers capture an emerging theoretical frontier with an eye to making science communication efforts smarter and more effective.

SPSP 2017 Day Two on Twitter

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Friday at the Annual Convention started early with a 5K Fun run and walk, followed by the opening Presidential Plenary, "Social and Personality Psychology in Industry: What Next?." Attendees experienced a busy day of scientific sessions, a towhn hall forum, careeer networking and receptions. Even for those attending convention, there's so much to see it's hard to get to everything.

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There's a Limited Window to Change Commuting Habits

San Antonio, Texas - Over 128 million daily commuters in the U.S. and 75% report they drive alone. From improving traffic flow to air quality, convincing people to choose a possibly “greener” mode of transportation presents many challenges. Psychology researcher Gregory Thomas (Cardiff University) shows that if people are going to change their commuting habit, it needs to happen within the first three months of a move. He will present his research at the 18th Annual Convention of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

Wealth Doesn’t Always Equal Health

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“Wealth equals health” has been a commonly accepted principle for decades. Beginning in 1967, the classic Whitehall studies revealed that higher-class British civil servants had lower risks of mortality from a wide range of diseases

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