The Block Award is SPSP's senior career award for research accomplishment in personality psychology. It was named for Jack Block, who was known for his analytic and theoretical sophistication and depth, as well as for his broad interests. The recipients of this award are recognized for their scientifically rigorous career research accomplishments in personality psychology rather than for a specific discovery or article. 

Award Info

Description

About the Award

Founded in 2000, the Jack Block Award for Distinguished Research in Personality is a senior career award that honors a researcher for accomplishment in personality psychology. This award is intended to recognize rigorous research over one's career, rather than one specific discovery or publication.

Recipients of this award receive a $1000 honorarium and accompanying plaque, which are presented at the annual Awards Ceremony held at the SPSP Annual Convention, as well as a complimentary one-year SPSP membership. In addition, travel and registration to the convention are provided, plus a three-night hotel stay, and the recipient will give an address in a special plenary session (along with the Campbell Award and Distinguished Scholar recipients).

About Jack Block

Jack BlockA professor of psychology at UC-Berkeley, Jack Block was a pioneer in the theoretical and empirical study of personality. The SPSP Personality Researcher Award was renamed the Jack Block Award upon Block being its first recipient in 2000. Block remained a professor emeritus at UC-Berkeley until his death in 2010.

In addition to his empirical work on personality development, Block was a tireless critic, offering challenges and insights to many of the reigning paradigms in personality psychology. In insightful and rigorous terms, he offered published critiques of the Five Factors Model, the Act-Frequency approach, depressive realism, and response sets. However, Block's most important contribution was the great understanding he provided of personality consistency and stability from early childhood into adulthood. (Source: Spring 2001 dialogue)